Anna York's Comments

Comment Wall (20 comments)

At 8:13am on July 12, 2012, Meredith Hubel said…

Hi Anna - Just checking on when the video might be available; I'm excited about starting the Qi Gong training!

Meredith

At 12:16pm on July 21, 2012, Anna York said…

Hi Meredith, The Qigong video is out and on amazon. Here is the link: 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B008FS7YIK  It's also on my website. Blessings,

Anna 

At 12:19pm on August 10, 2012, Meredith Hubel said…

Anna - Thanks for the notice. Actually, I already ordered it, have received it and have started  practicng the first day.

It is really great - easy to follow, and has been very good for calming my tremors and improving my balance.

Thank you very much!

Meredith 

At 4:05pm on September 22, 2012, Anna York said…

I continued the rehab of my left knee and left side today. Doing Tai Chi walking is meditative walking and it is one of the best things I do for my rehabilitation. It is slow, mindful walking, thinking and feeling into each and every step. I slowly place my feet and shift the weight fully from one foot to the other. I sense and feel the muscles fire, first in my foot and then all the way up the leg and into the hip and back. Since I have neurological damage in my ankle flexor, knee and hip flexor, I have to mindfully fire the various muscles to get them to fire in the proper sequence. This is getting easier all the time as I gain strength. Throughout the day I try to do 100% Tai Chi walking. That means my whole daily pace is much slower. It also means that I gain strength much faster than I would if I were just doing it now and then throughout the day. I have to plan my activities to be sure I have time and energy to do the things that are most important. That's okay. My top priority right now is to get strong so I can do the things I want to do with more energy and without pain. I want to be strong for my retirement years.

At 6:28pm on September 23, 2012, Anna York said…

The basic posture that the Tai Chi Training Team is working on now is fundamental to all Tai Chi-Qigong movement and principles. Energy flows most efficiently through a body that is straight and open, allowing full circulation, respiration and function of all the organs in the body. I am rehabilitating my left side and working on improving my gait. I constantly remind myself that I need to stand tall with my shoulders open, the crown of my head up, and my hips slightly tucked as I walk. This allows my feet and legs to move more effectively. If I slouch, there is downward pressure on my legs that drives my feet more into the ground and causes me to trip. Walking erect with my head up also allows me to use my eyes and peripheral vision more effectively to help me keep my balance. The importance of posture cannot be overstated.

At 1:45pm on September 24, 2012, Anna York said…

On my walk this morning I was highly aware of the importance of posture. In the lower body, the hips need to be tucked. In the upper body to keep the chest bone lifted up, which improves ability to work the legs. The shoulders should be open. However, focusing on lifting the chest is a better strategy than concentrating on drawing the shoulders back, which may not necessarily open the whole front of the body. Practice lifting with the chestbone and then just drawing the shoulders back, and you will see the difference.

At 6:24pm on November 8, 2012, Anna York said…

Great training class today! Everyone is working hard at improving their movements and at learning how to give clear instructions. The big goal here is to learn how the healing works in ourselves. Then we can be more successful in teaching others how to heal themselves.

At 8:22am on January 11, 2013, Anna York said…

The "Clouds" movement on the DVD. Today at our leadership class we worked on "Clouds." Clouds appears to be so simple, and yet it has deep and profound healing effects. It feels absolutely wonderful when you are doing it, giving a sense of physical peace and inner calm. The circular and elliptical patterns of the arms are soothing at the same time they loosen and tone the muscles in the upper body. Shifting the weight back and forth produces a rocking motion that is comforting at the same time it strengthens the legs and builds stability in the lower body. Repetitive movements help to neurologically train visual-motor skills and help coordinate both sides of the brain. Clouds is one of the favorite movements in my classes because of its beauty, peace and the wonderful sense of harmony when everyone is "on the same cloud." 

At 7:47pm on February 1, 2013, Anna York said…

Great quotes: Jerry: "I had a stroke in 1982. Tai Chi has been really good for me. My gait's a lot better than it used to be." Tai Chi DVD 

At 6:44pm on February 16, 2013, Anna York said…

Great Quotes--Tai Chi & Arthritis: "I can't keep up with some of those exercise videos. But Tai Chi class really helps me." 

At 6:45pm on February 16, 2013, Anna York said…

Great Quotes--Tai Chi & Arthritis: With Tai Chi you don’t have to get up and down off the floor. I get a lot out of Tai Chi class. 

At 6:47pm on February 16, 2013, Anna York said…

Great Quotes--Tai Chi & Stroke: Now I can do things I couldn't do before. It has really made a difference in my quality of life!  http://www.amazon.com/dp/B008FS7YIK 

At 6:48pm on February 16, 2013, Anna York said…

Great Quotes--Tai Chi & Stroke: It helps with things I do every day. I’m able to lift jars out of the refrigerator and open them. 

At 6:49pm on February 16, 2013, Anna York said…

Great Quotes--Tai Chi & Stroke: Taking a bath was frustrating. I couldn’t wash my toes, but now I can bend over and do that. 

At 6:49pm on February 16, 2013, Anna York said…

Great Quotes--Tai Chi for Stroke: We do side stepping and that helps me with my balance. My hand was very tight & now it's open.  

At 6:51pm on February 16, 2013, Anna York said…

Great Quotes--Tai Chi & Stroke: I had a stroke in 1982. My doctors think it is good for me to do Tai Chi. It helps me keep going, taking care of three children. 

At 6:56pm on February 16, 2013, Anna York said…

Tai Chi Class has been very inspirational. Just a better attitude about everything, meeting people, very positive!  

At 6:56pm on February 16, 2013, Anna York said…

Great quotes--Tai Chi for Stroke: I can hold my hands above my head. I couldn’t do that before I started class. 

At 6:58pm on February 16, 2013, Anna York said…

Great quotes--Tai Chi for stroke: Before, my arm was tight to my body and now it’s a lot looser. I can move it around and lift it up. 

At 4:58pm on February 21, 2013, Anna York said…

Tai Chi is good for stroke! According to reported global estimates, 15 million people suffer from a stroke each year, resulting in 5.5 million deaths, with 5 million left permanently disabled. Typical disabilities following stroke include poor neuromuscular control, hemodynamic imbalance, and negative mood state. Tai Chi (TC) is associated with better balance, lower blood pressure, and improved mood, which are important for stroke survivors. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17698454 

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